Timeline - Chronology of Ljubljana

2000 BC
Around 2000 BC, the Ljubljana Marshes in the immediate vicinity of Ljubljana were settled by people living in pile dwellings.

1200 BC
The area surrounding today's castle has been continuously inhabited since 1200 BC.

300 BC, 201 BC
Later, the area remained a transit point for numerous tribes and peoples, among them the Illyrians, followed by a mixed nation of the Celts and the Illyrians called the Iapydes, and then in the 3rd century BC a Celtic tribe, the Taurisci.

160
Ljubljana is located some 320 kilometers (200 mi) south of Munich, 477 kilometers (296 mi) east of Zürich, 250 kilometers (160 mi) east of Venice, 350 kilometers (220 mi) southwest of Vienna, 224 kilometers (139 mi) south of Salzburg and 400 kilometers (250 mi) southwest of Budapest.

501, 600
In the 6th century, the ancestors of the Slovenes moved in.

676
The highest point of the city, called Grmada, reaches 676 meters (2,218 ft), three m (9.8 ft) more than the nearby Mount Saint Mary (Šmarna gora) peak, a popular hiking destination.

Ljubljana in years

Ljubljana in years

801, 900
In the 9th century, they fell under Frankish domination, while experiencing frequent Magyar raids.

968
Ljubljana has an elevation of 295 meters (968 ft) The city centre, located along the Ljubljanica River, has an elevation of 298 meters (978 ft).

1101, 1200
Ljubljana itself was first mentioned in the first half of the 12th century.

1101, 1200
Originally owned by a number of possessors, until the first half of the 12th century, the territory south of the Sava where the town of Ljubljana developed gradually became property of the Carinthian family of the Dukes of Sponheim.

1101, 1200
Urban settlement in Ljubljana started in the second half of the 12th century.

Ljubljana in decades

Ljubljana in decades

1101, 1200
The castle was built in the 12th century and was a residence of the Margraves, later the Dukes of Carniola.

1112, 1125
According to the historian Peter Štih's deduction, this happened between 1112 and 1125, thus representing the earliest mention of Ljubljana.

1161
The parchment sheet Nomina defunctorum ("Names of the Dead"), most probably written in the second half of 1161, mentions the nobleman Rudolf of Tarcento, a lawyer of the Patriarchate of Aquileia, who had bestowed a canon with 20 farmsteads beside the castle of Ljubljana (castrum Leibach) to the Patriarchate.

1200
At around 1200, market rights were granted to Old Square (Stari trg), which at the time was one of the three districts that Ljubljana originated from.

1200, 1299
Historically the first school in Ljubljana belonged to Teutonic Knights and was established in the 13th century.

Ljubljana in centuries

Ljubljana in centuries

1200, 1299
Parochial schools are attested in the 13th century, at St.

1220, 1243
Ljubljana acquired the town privileges at some time between 1220 and 1243.

1270
In the late 1270, Ljubljana was conquered by King Ottokar II of Bohemia.

1278
In 1278, after Ottokar's defeat, it became—together with the rest of Carniola—property of Rudolph of Habsburg.

1279, 1335
It was administered by the Counts of Gorizia from 1279 until 1335, when it became the capital town of Carniola.

Europe relief laea location map

Reproduced from WIKI

Europe relief laea location map

1291
Since 1291, there were also trade-oriented private schools in Ljubljana.

1327, 1515
In 1327, the Ljubljana's "Jewish Quarter"—now only "Jewish Street" (Židovska ulica) remains—was established with a synagogue, and lasted until Emperor Maximilian I in 1515 succumbed to medieval antisemitism and expelled Jews from Ljubljana, for which he demanded a certain payment from the town.

1382
In 1382, in front of St.

1401, 1500
It is historically more believable that the dragon was adopted from Saint George, the patron of the Ljubljana Castle chapel built in the 15th century.

1401, 1500
In the 15th century, Ljubljana became recognised for its art, particularly painting and sculpture.

Valvasor 1689 Ljubljana lintvern

Reproduced from WIKI

Valvasor 1689 Ljubljana lintvern

1461
The Roman Rite Catholic Diocese of Ljubljana was established in 1461 and the Church of St.

1461
The Diocese of Ljubljana was set up in 1461.

1484
The original building was built in a Gothic style in 1484.

1500, 1599
It originally accepted only boys; girls were accepted from the beginning of the 16th century.

1501, 1600
In the 16th century, the Population of Ljubljana numbered 5,000, 70% of whom spoke Slovene as their first language, with most of the rest using German.

Ljubljana-Valvasor

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana-Valvasor

1511
After the 1511 Idrija earthquake, the city was rebuilt in the Renaissance style and a new wall was built around it.

1511, 1895
A number of earthquakes have devastated Ljubljana, including in 1511 and 1895.

1511
After the 1511 earthquake, it was rebuilt in the Baroque style following Italian, particularly Venetian, models.

1524
Wooden buildings were forbidden after a large fire at New Square in 1524.

1529
From 1529, Ljubljana had an active Slovene Protestant community.

Pristani%C5%A1%C4%8De na Bregu 1765

Reproduced from WIKI

Pristani%C5%A1%C4%8De na Bregu 1765

1563, 1598
Historically, upon a proposal by Primož Trubar, the Carniolan Estates' School (1563–1598) was established in 1563 in the period of Slovene Reformation.

1569
The first public library was the Carniolan Estates' Library, established in 1569 by Primož Trubar.

1597, 1606
In 1597, Jesuits arrived in the city, followed in 1606 by the Capuchins, to eradicate Protestantism.

1597, 1773
In 1597, Jesuits established the Jesuit College (1597–1773), intended to transmit general education.

1598
After they were expelled in 1598, marking the beginning of the Counter-Reformation, Catholic Bishop Thomas Chrön ordered the public burning of eight cartloads of Protestant books.

%C5%A0pitalski most%2C Marijin trg in pogled proti %C5%A0marni gori z gradu 1900

Reproduced from WIKI

%C5%A0pitalski most%2C Marijin trg in pogled proti %C5%A0marni gori z gradu 1900

1600, 1699
In the beginning of the 17th century, there were six schools in Ljubljana and later three.

1600, 1699
In the 17th century, the Jesuit Library collected numerous works, particularly about mathematics.

1601, 1700
In the middle and the second half of the 17th century, foreign architects built and renovated numerous monasteries, churches, and palaces in Ljubljana and introduced Baroque architecture.

1646, 1660
Built between 1646 and 1660 (the belltowers following later), it replaced an older Gothic church on the same site.

1688
The first society of the leading scientists and public workers in Carniola was the Dismas Fraternity (Latin: Societas Unitorum), formed in Ljubljana in 1688.

Ljubljana in 1895 %283%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana in 1895 %283%29

1693, 1700, 1799
In 1693, the Academia Operosorum Labacensium was founded and lasted with an interruption until the end of the 18th century.

1700, 1799, 1800, 1899
Existing already in the 18th century, the Ljubljana central square, the Prešeren Square's modern appearance has developed since the end of the 19th century.

1701, 1706
Between 1701 and 1706, the Jesuit architect Andrea Pozzo designed the Baroque church with two side chapels shaped in the form of a Latin cross.

1701
It was established in 1701 as part of Academia operosorum Labacensis and is among the oldest such institutions in Europe.

1702
In 1702, the Ursulines settled in the town, where, the following year, they opened the first public school for girls in the Slovene Lands.

-Ljubljana 1909 %28Salvatore Spina%29 removed watermark.ogv

Reproduced from WIKI

-Ljubljana 1909 %28Salvatore Spina%29 removed watermark.ogv

1703, 1706, 1721, 1723
The interior is decorated with Baroque frescos painted by Giulio Quaglio between 1703–1706 and 1721–1723.

1703
A girls' school was established by Poor Clares, followed in 1703 by the Ursulines.

1707
In 1707, the Seminary Library was established; it is the first and oldest public scientific library in Slovenia.

1717, 1719
Between 1717 and 1719, the building underwent a Baroque renovation with a Venetian inspiration by the architect Gregor Maček, Sr..

1772, 1780
From the Trnovo District to the Moste District, around Castle Hill, the Ljubljanica partly flows through the Gruber Canal, built according to plans by Gabriel Gruber from 1772 until 1780.

SmarnaGora

Reproduced from WIKI

SmarnaGora

1773
In 1773, secondary education came under the control of the state.

1774
Around 1774, after the dissolution of Jesuits, the Lyceum Library was formed from the remains of the Jesuit Library as well as several monastery libraries.

1775
In 1775, the Austrian Empress Maria Theresa proclaimed elementary education obligatory and Ljubljana got its normal school, intended as a learning place for teachers.

1779
In 1779, St.

1797
Renamed Laibach, it would be owned by the House of Habsburg until 1797.

Ljubljana Ljubljanski Grad-Ljubljana Castle - jug south

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana Ljubljanski Grad-Ljubljana Castle - jug south

1800, 1899
The street is named after Matija Čop, an early 19th-century literary figure and close friend of the Slovene Romantic poet France Prešeren.

1800, 1899, 1920, 1929
The modern dance was presented in Ljubljana for the first time at the end of the 19th century and developed rapidly since the end of the 1920s.

1800, 1899
A tension between German and Slovene residents dominated the development of sport of Ljubljana in the 19th century.

1800, 1899, 1900, 1999
In addition, in the 19th century and the early 20th century, Tivoli Pond and a marshy meadow in Trnovo, named Kern, were used for ice skating.

1800, 1899
A number of reforms were implemented in the 19th century; there was more emphasis on general knowledge and religious education was removed from state secondary schools.

View on Ljubljana from Neboti%C4%8Dnik Tower %2838458386985%29

Reproduced from WIKI

View on Ljubljana from Neboti%C4%8Dnik Tower %2838458386985%29

1800, 1899
The river transport on the Ljubljanica and the Sava was the main means of cargo transport to and from the city until the mid-19th century, when railroads were built.

1805
In 1805, the first state music school was established in Ljubljana.

1809, 1813
From 1809 to 1813, during the Napoleonic interlude, Ljubljana (under the name Laybach) was the capital of the Illyrian Provinces.

1810
It started operating under the leadership of Franc Hladnik in 1810.

1810, 1811
Historically, higher schools offering the study of general medicine, surgery, architecture, law and theology, started to operate in Ljubljana during the French occupation of the Slovene Lands, in 1810–11.

Ljubljana Ljubljanski Grad-Ljubljana Castle -Sever North

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana Ljubljanski Grad-Ljubljana Castle -Sever North

1813, 1815, 1849
In 1813, the city became Austrian again and from 1815 to 1849 was the administrative centre of the Kingdom of Illyria in the Austrian Empire.

1813
It was designed in 1813 by the French engineer Jean Blanchard and now covers approximately 5 km2 (1.9 sq mi).

1813
The park was laid out during the French imperial administration of Ljubljana in 1813 and named after the Parisian Jardins de Tivoli.

1821
In 1821, it hosted the Congress of Laibach, which fixed European political borders for years to come.

1821
It was built in 1821 for ceremonial purposes such as Congress of Ljubljana after which it was named.

Ljubljanica banks night

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljanica banks night

1841
The dome was built in the centre in 1841.

1848
The castle's Viewing Tower dates to 1848; this was inhabited by a guard whose duty it was to fire cannons warning the city in case of fire or announcing important visitors or events, a function the castle still holds today.

1849
The first train arrived in 1849 from Vienna and in 1857 the line was extended to Trieste.

1863, 1868
The first sport club in Ljubljana was the South Sokol Gymnastic Club (Gimnastično društvo Južni Sokol), established in 1863 and succeeded in 1868 by the Ljubljana Sokol (Ljubljanski Sokol).

1867
The Hradecky Bridge was manufactured according to the plans of the senior engineer Johann Hermann from Vienna in the Auersperg iron foundry in Dvor near Žužemberk, and installed in Ljubljana in 1867, at the location of today's Cobblers' Bridge.

Kose%C5%A1ki bajer

Reproduced from WIKI

Kose%C5%A1ki bajer

1867
Theatre has a rich tradition in Ljubljana, starting with the 1867 first ever Slovene-language drama performance.

1868
The first public schools, unrelated to religious education, appeared in 1868.

1869, 1931
In 1869, Ljubljana had about 22,600 inhabitants, a figure that grew to almost 60,000 by 1931.

1882, 1911
Metelkova and RogA Ljubljana equivalent of the Copenhagen's Freetown Christiania, a self-proclaimed autonomous Metelkova neighbourhood, was set up in a former Austro-Hungarian barracks that were built in 1882 (completed in 1911).

1885
In 1885, German residents established the first sports club in the territory of nowadays Slovenia, Der Laibacher Byciklistischer Club (Ljubljana Cycling Club).

Ljubljana Pre%C5%A1eren Square

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana Pre%C5%A1eren Square

1887
In 1887, Slovene cyclists established the Slovene Cyclists Club (Slovenski biciklistični klub).

1893
In 1893 followed the first Slovene Alpine club, named Slovene Alpine Club (Slovensko planinsko društvo), later succeeded by the Alpine Association of Slovenia (Planinska zveza Slovenije).

1895
In 1895, Ljubljana, then a city of 31,000, suffered a serious earthquake measuring 6.1 degrees Richter and 8–9 degrees MCS.

1895
After the quake in 1895, it was once again rebuilt, this time in the Vienna Secession style, which today is juxtaposed against the earlier Baroque style buildings that remain.

1895
Much of the original frescos were ruined by the cracks in the ceiling caused by the Ljubljana earthquake in 1895.

R%C3%ADo Ljubljanica%2C Liubliana%2C Eslovenia%2C 2017-04-14%2C DD 06

Reproduced from WIKI

R%C3%ADo Ljubljanica%2C Liubliana%2C Eslovenia%2C 2017-04-14%2C DD 06

1895, 1980, 1989
After the 1895 earthquake, Max Fabiani designed the square as the hub of four streets and four banks, and in the 1980s, Edvard Ravnikar proposed the circular design and the granite block pavement.

1895, 1913
It was planned already in 1895 by Maks Fabiani to build a bridge on the location, in 1913 Alfred Keller planned a staircase, later Jože Plečnik incorporated both into his own plans which, however, were not realised.

1896, 1910
The rebuilding period between 1896 and 1910 is referred to as the "revival of Ljubljana" because of architectural changes from which a great deal of the city dates back to today and for reform of urban administration, health, education and tourism that followed.

1898
Public electric lighting appeared in the city in 1898.

1900, 1999
It was designed in the second half of the 20th century by Edvard Ravnikar.

Ljubljana BW 2014-10-09 11-34-41

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana BW 2014-10-09 11-34-41

1900, 1999
The first purpose-built art gallery in Ljubljana was the Jakopič Pavilion, which was in the first half of the 20th century the central exhibition venue of Slovene artists.

1900, 1999
The cinema in Ljubljana appeared for the first time at the turn of the 20th century, and quickly gained popularity among the residents.

1900, 1909
In 1900, the sports club Laibacher Sportverein (English: Ljubljana Sports Club) was established by the city's German residents and functioned until 1909.

1901, 2000
In the Baroque, it became part of the coat of arms, and in the 19th and especially the 20th century, it outstripped the tower and other elements in importance.

1901, 2000
In the second half of the 20th century, parts of Ljubljana were redesigned by Edvard Ravnikar.

Robbafountain

Reproduced from WIKI

Robbafountain

1901
The 1901 Dragon Bridge, decorated with the Dragon statues on pedestals at four corners of the bridge has become a symbol of the city and is regarded as one of the most beautiful examples of a bridge made in Vienna Secession style.

1901, 1928, 1931, 1940, 1959
Historical Ljubljana tram system was completed in 1901 and was replaced by buses in 1928, which were in turn abolished and replaced by trams in 1931 in its final length of 18.5 kilometers (11.5 mi) in 1940, In 1959, it was abolished in favor of automobiles; the tracks were dismantled and tram cars were transferred to Osijek and Subotica.

1902, 1918
From the beginning, the seat of the university has been at Congress Square in a building that served as the State Mansion of Carniola from 1902 to 1918.

1905
The Prešeren Monument was created by Ivan Zajec in 1905, whereas the pedestal was designed by Max Fabiani.

1906
In 1906, Slovenes organised themselves in its Slovene counterpart, the Ljubljana Sports Club (Ljubljanski športni klub).

Fuente de la Plaza Nueva%2C Liubliana%2C Eslovenia%2C 2017-04-14%2C DD 44-46 HDR

Reproduced from WIKI

Fuente de la Plaza Nueva%2C Liubliana%2C Eslovenia%2C 2017-04-14%2C DD 44-46 HDR

1910
In 1910, there were 29 secondary schools in Ljubljana, among them classical and real gymnasiums and Realschules (technical secondary schools).

1911
In 1911, the first Slovene football club, Ilirija, started operating in the city.

1918
It was under Habsburg rule from the Middle Ages until the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918.

1918
This name was in official use as an endonym until 1918, and it remains frequent as a German exonym, both in common speech and official use. The city is alternatively named Lublana in many English language documents.

1918
In 1918, following the end of World War I and the dissolution of Austria-Hungary, the region joined the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Ljubljana BW 2014-10-09 12-19-48

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana BW 2014-10-09 12-19-48

1918
The National Gallery (Narodna galerija), founded in 1918, and the Museum of Modern Art (Moderna galerija) exhibit the most influential Slovenian artists.

1918, 1929
There was a military airport in Šiška from 1918 until 1929.

1919
Austro-Hungarian Empire never allowed Slovenes to establish their own university in Ljubljana and the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia's most important university, was founded in 1919 after Slovenes joined the first Yugoslavia.

1921, 1929, 1939
Between 1921 and 1939, it was renovated by the Slovene architect Jože Plečnik, who unveiled his statue of Napoleon in 1929 in Republic Square and designed a broad central promenade, called the Jakopič Promenade (Jakopičevo sprehajališče) after the leading Slovene impressionist painter Rihard Jakopič.

1929
In 1929, Ljubljana became the capital of the Drava Banovina, a Yugoslav province.

Ljubljana BW 2014-10-09 13-57-30

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana BW 2014-10-09 13-57-30

1929, 1932
It was built between 1929 and 1932.

1929
In 1929, the first ice hockey club in Slovenia (then Yugoslavia) SK Ilirija was established.

1929
An outdoor swimming pool in Tivoli, constructed by Bloudek in 1929, was the first Olympic-size swimming pool in Yugoslavia.

1930
The 1930 ‘Cobblers’ Bridge’ (Šuštarski, from German Schuster – Shoemaker) is another Plečnik's creation, connecting two major areas of medieval Ljubljana.

1930, 1939
Since the 1930s when in Ljubljana was founded a Mary Wigman dance school, the first one for modern dance in Slovenia, the field has been intimately linked to the development in Europe and the United States.

Neboticnik Tower 1

Reproduced from WIKI

Neboticnik Tower 1

1930, 1939
At the northern end of Tivoli Park stands the Ilirija Swimming Pool Complex, which was built as part of a swimming and athletics venue following plans by Bloudek in the 1930s and has been nearly abandoned since then, but there are plans to renovate it.

21 February 1933, July 1930
Construction began in July 1930 and the building opened on 21 February 1933.

1933, 1963
This airport has superseded the original Ljubljana airport, in operation from 1933 until 1963.

1938
The next academy in Ljubljana, the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, was not established until 1938.

1940, 1949
Since the 1940s, a ski slope has been in use in Gunclje, in the northwestern part of the city.

Ljubljana building of former Cooperative Bank

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana building of former Cooperative Bank

3 May 1941
In 1941, during World War II, Fascist Italy occupied the city, and on 3 May 1941 made Lubiana the capital of Italy's Province of Ljubljana with the former Yugoslav general Leon Rupnik as mayor.

February 1942
Since February 1942, the city was surrounded by barbed wire, later fortified by bunkers, to prevent co-operation between the resistance movement that operated within and outside the fence.

9 May 1945, 1943
After the Italian capitulation, Nazi Germany with SS-general Erwin Rösener and Friedrich Rainer took control in 1943, but formally the city remained the capital of an Italian province until 9 May 1945.

9 May 1945
Each year since 1957, on 8–10 May, the traditional recreational Walk Along the Wire has taken place to mark the liberation of Ljubljana on 9 May 1945.

1950, 1953
The Ljubljana Festival is one of the two oldest festivals in former Yugoslavia (the Dubrovnik Summer Festival was established in 1950, and the Ljubljana Festival one in 1953).

Ljubljana streets %2811330213013%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana streets %2811330213013%29

1951, 1971
Sometimes the buses are called trole (referring to trolley poles), harking back to the 1951–71 days when Ljubljana had trolleybus (trolejbus) service.

1954, 1976
A ski jumping hill, build in 1954 upon the plans by Stanko Bloudek, was located in Šiška near Vodnik Street (Vodnikova cesta) until 1976.

1955, 2010
The Tacen Whitewater Course, located on a course on the Sava, 8 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the city centre, hosts a major international canoe/kayak slalom competition almost every year, examples being the ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships in 1955, 1991, and 2010.

1958
There were five trolleybus lines in Ljubljana, until 1958 alongside the tram.

1960, 1969
In the early 1960s, it was succeeded by the Ljubljana City Art Gallery, which has presented a number of modern Slovene and foreign artists.

Ljubljana stritarjeva ulica

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana stritarjeva ulica

1960, 1963, 1969
A number of cinema festivals took place in the 1960s, and a cinematheque opened its doors in 1963.

1980, 1989
In the 1980s with the emergence of subcultures in Ljubljana, an alternative culture begun to develop in Ljubljana organised around two student organisations.

1985
Since 1985, the a commemorative trail has ringed the city where this iron fence once stood.

1986
Since 1986, Ljubljana is part of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network.

1988
Since then it became an important centre for political ceremonies, demonstrations and protests, such as the ceremony at creation of Kingdom of Yugoslavia, ceremony of liberation of Belgrade, protests against Yugoslav authority in 1988 etc.

Dragon Bridge 1 %285756113569%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Dragon Bridge 1 %285756113569%29

1991
It has been the cultural, educational, economic, political, and administrative centre of independent Slovenia since 1991.

1991
It retained this status until Slovenia became independent in 1991 and Ljubljana became capital of the newly formed state.

1991
It retained this status until Slovenia became independent in 1991.

1991, 2014
From 1991 to 2014 the bridge was a wooden one and decorated with flowers, while since its reconstruction in 2014, it is made of glass.

26 June 1991
On 26 June 1991, the independence of Slovenia was declared here.

Love padlocks on the Butchers%27 Bridge %28Ljubljana%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Love padlocks on the Butchers%27 Bridge %28Ljubljana%29

1993
In 1993, the seven buildings and 12,500 m2 of space were turned into art galleries, artist studios, and seven nightclubs, including two LGBTQ+ venues, playing host to all range of music from hardcore to jazz to dub to techno.

1994
Ljudmila (since 1994) strives to connect research practices, technologies, science, and art.

2000, 2009
Reintroduction of an actual tram system to Ljubljana has been proposed repeatedly in the 2000s.

2002, 2006
Between 2002 and 2006, Danica Simšič was mayor of the municipality.

2002
At the 2002 census, 39% of Ljubljana inhabitants were Catholic; 30% had no religion, an unknown religion or did not reply; 19% atheist; 6% Eastern Orthodox; 5% Muslim; and the remaining 0.7% Protestant or another religion.

Ljubljana in Ljubljanica

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana in Ljubljanica

2004
Ljubljana remains the capital of independent Slovenia, which joined the European Union in 2004.

2004
It was built according to the plans of Jože Plečnik and was the home of the NK Olimpija Ljubljana, dissolved in 2004.

2006
Since 2006, a funicular has linked the city centre to the castle atop the hill.

2006
The original has been moved into the National Gallery in 2006.

2006
In 2006, the museums received 264,470 visitors, the galleries 403,890 and the theatres 396,440.

Ljubljana %2833118110974%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljana %2833118110974%29

2006
In 2006, he won 62.99% of the popular vote.

2006
At the end of 2006, the Ljubljana Castle funicular started to operate.

22 October 2006, December 2011
Since the municipal elections of 22 October 2006 until his confirmation as a deputy in the National Assembly of Slovenian in December 2011, Zoran Janković, previously the managing director of the Mercator retail chain, was the mayor of Ljubljana.

October 2006
From 2006 until October 2010, the majority on the city council (the Zoran Janković List) held 23 of 45 seats.

2007
The origin from the Slavic ljub- "to love, like" was in 2007 supported as the most probable by the linguist Tijmen Pronk, a specialist in comparative Indo-European linguistics and Slovene dialectology, from the University of Leiden.

Trnovo Bridge

Reproduced from WIKI

Trnovo Bridge

1 September 2007
The square and surroundings have been closed to traffic since 1 September 2007.

September 2007
The core city centre has been closed for motor traffic since September 2007 (except for residents with permissions), creating a pedestrian zone around Prešeren Square.

2008
Another stadium in the Bežigrad district, Bežigrad Stadium, is closed since 2008 and is deteriorating.

2008
The Ljubljana Stock Exchange (Ljubljanska borza), purchased in 2008 by the Vienna Stock Exchange, deals with large Slovenian companies.

2008
Municipal Library and other librariesThe Municipal City Library of Ljubljana, established in 2008, is the central regional library and the largest Slovenian general public library.

Ljubljanska Opera 2

Reproduced from WIKI

Ljubljanska Opera 2

1 July 2008
A toll sticker system has been in use on the Ljubljana Ring Road since 1 July 2008.

May 2009
Another means of public road transport in the city centre is the Cavalier (Kavalir), an electric vehicle operated by LPP since May 2009.

2010
The latest floods took place in 2010.

2010, 2011
In 2010 and 2011, the square was heavily renovated and is now mostly closed to road traffic on ground area, however there are five floors for commercial purposes and a parking lot located underground.

2010
In 2010, there were 14 museums and 56 art galleries in Ljubljana.

Kino %C5%A0i%C5%A1ka Centre for Urban Culture -- Do not copy this file to Wikimedia Commons

Reproduced from WIKI

Kino %C5%A0i%C5%A1ka Centre for Urban Culture -- Do not copy this file to Wikimedia Commons

2010
The latter, which has a green dragon as its mascot, hosts its matches at the 12,480-seat Arena Stožice since 2010.

August 2010
The Stožice Stadium, opened since August 2010 and located in Stožice Sports Park in the Bežigrad District, is the biggest football stadium in the country and the home of the NK Olimpija Ljubljana.

10 October 2010
On 10 October 2010, Janković was re-elected for another four-year term with 64.79% of the vote.

10 October 2010
On 10 October 2010, Janković's list won 25 out of 45 seats in the city council.

2011
The Metelkova Museum of Contemporary Art (Muzej sodobne umetnosti Metelkova), opened in 2011, hosts various simultaneous exhibitions, a research library, archives, and a bookshop.

Metelkova mesto6

Reproduced from WIKI

Metelkova mesto6

2011
In 2011, the University had 23 faculties and three academies, located in different parts of Ljubljana.

2011
In 2011, it held about 1,307,000 books, 8,700 manuscripts, and numerous other textual, visual and multimedia resources, altogether 2,657,000 volumes.

2011
In 2011, it held 1,657,000 volumes, among these 1,432,000 books and a multitude of other resources in 36 branches.

May 2011
Since May 2011, the BicikeLJ, a self-service bicycle rental system offers the residents and visitors of Ljubljana 510 bicycles and more than 600 parking spots at 51 stations in the wider city centre area.

June 2011
Their archaeological remains, nowadays in the Municipality of Ig, have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site since June 2011, in the common nomination of six Alpine states.

Tacen Whitewater Course 2

Reproduced from WIKI

Tacen Whitewater Course 2

December 2011
From December 2011 onwards, when Janković's list won the early parliamentary election, the deputy mayor Aleš Čerin was decided by him to lead the municipality.

25 March 2012
After Janković had failed to be elected as the Prime Minister in the National Assembly, he participated at the mayoral by-election on 25 March 2012 and was elected for the third time with 61% of the vote.

11 April 2012
He retook the leadership of the city council on 11 April 2012.

2014, 2016
In 2014, Ljubljana won the European Green Capital Award for 2016 for its environmental achievements.

2015
Nevertheless, the situation has been steadily improving; in 2015, Ljubljana placed 13th in a ranking of the world's most bicycle-friendly cities.

BTC City panorama

Reproduced from WIKI

BTC City panorama

July 2015
In July 2015, over four days, the 56th Ljubljana Jazz Festival took place.

2016
In 2016 Ljubljana was already 8th on the Copenhagenize list.