Timeline - Chronology of Paris

300 BC, 201 BC
The Parisii, a sub-tribe of the Celtic Senones, inhabited the Paris area from around the middle of the 3rd century BC.

10 December 1879, 28 July 1947
The highest recorded temperature is 40.4 °C (104.7 °F) on 28 July 1947, and the lowest is −23.9 °C (−11.0 °F) on 10 December 1879.

20 May 2014
There are a total of 20 arrondissement mayors and 120 deputy mayors.

150, 1870, 1879, 1880, 1889
Bal-musette is a style of French music and dance that first became popular in Paris in the 1870s and 1880s; by 1880 Paris had some 150 dance halls in the working-class neighbourhoods of the city.

160, 1974, 2010
In recent developments, a 1974–2010 building height limitation of 37 metres (121 ft) was raised to 50 m (160 ft) in central areas and 180 metres (590 ft) in some of Paris's peripheral quarters, yet for some of the city's more central quarters, even older building-height laws still remain in effect.

200, 299
Christianity was introduced in the middle of the 3rd century AD by Saint Denis, the first Bishop of Paris: according to legend, when he refused to renounce his faith before the Roman occupiers, he was beheaded on the hill which became known as Mons Martyrum (Latin "Hill of Martyrs"), later "Montmartre", from where he walked headless to the north of the city; the place where he fell and was buried became an important religious shrine, the Basilica of Saint-Denis, and many French kings are buried there.

Paris in years

Paris in years

450
Measured from the 'point zero' in front of its Notre-Dame cathedral, Paris by road is 450 kilometres (280 mi) southeast of London, 287 kilometres (178 mi) south of Calais, 305 kilometres (190 mi) southwest of Brussels, 774 kilometres (481 mi) north of Marseille, 385 kilometres (239 mi) northeast of Nantes, and 135 kilometres (84 mi) southeast of Rouen.

681, 2016
The Paris Region had a GDP of €681 billion (US$850 billion) in 2016, accounting for 31 percent of the GDP of France, and is the 5th largest city by GDP in the world.

800
The Paris region's 800 aerospace companies employed 100,000.

885, 886
Fortification of the Île-de-la-Citie failed to avert sacking by Vikings in 845, but Paris's strategic importance—with its bridges preventing ships from passing—was established by successful defence in the Siege of Paris (885–86).

900, 999
After the marshland between the river Seine and its slower 'dead arm' to its north was filled in around the 10th century, Paris's cultural centre began to move to the Right Bank.

Paris in decades

Paris in decades

1014, 1144, 1163, 1239, 1248, 1345, 1627, 1641, 1670, 1708
Parisian examples of European architecture date back more than a millennium; including the Romanesque church of the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés (1014–1163); the early Gothic Architecture of the Basilica of Saint-Denis (1144), the Notre Dame Cathedral (1163–1345), the Flamboyant Gothic of Saint Chapelle (1239–1248), the Baroque churches of Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis (1627–1641) and Les Invalides (1670–1708).

1100, 1199
By the end of the 12th century, Paris had become the political, economic, religious, and cultural capital of France.

1100, 1190, 1199, 1215
In the late 12th century, Philip Augustus extended the Louvre fortress to defend the city against river invasions from the west, gave the city its first walls between 1190 and 1215, rebuilt its bridges to either side of its central island, and paved its main thoroughfares.

1100, 1199
In the late 12th century, a school of polyphony was established at Notre-Dame.

1100, 1199
The University of Paris, founded in the 12th century, is often called the Sorbonne after one of its original medieval colleges.

Paris in centuries

Paris in centuries

1137
In 1137, a new city marketplace (today's Les Halles) replaced the two smaller ones on the Île de la Cité and Place de la Grève (Hotel de Ville).

1163
In 1163, during the reign of Louis VII, Maurice de Sully, bishop of Paris, undertook the construction of the Notre Dame Cathedral at its eastern extremity.

1190
In 1190, he transformed Paris's former cathedral school into a student-teacher corporation that would become the University of Paris and would draw students from all of Europe.

1300
By comparison, London in 1300 had 80,000 inhabitants.

1328
With 200,000 inhabitants in 1328, Paris, then already the capital of France, was the most populous city of Europe.

Arc Triomphe %28square%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Arc Triomphe %28square%29

1418, 1420, 1429, 1436
During the Hundred Years' War, Paris was occupied by England-friendly Burgundian forces from 1418, before being occupied outright by the English when Henry V of England entered the French capital in 1420; in spite of a 1429 effort by Joan of Arc to liberate the city, it would remain under English occupation until 1436.

1470
The first book printed in France, Epistolae ("Letters"), by Gasparinus de Bergamo (Gasparino da Barzizza), was published in Paris in 1470 by the press established by Johann Heynlin.

24 August 1599, 1500
In the late 16th-century French Wars of Religion, Paris was a stronghold of the Catholic League, the organisers of 24 August 1572 St.

1500, 1599, 1600, 1699
Italian artists were a profound influence on the development of art in Paris in the 16th and 17th centuries, particularly in sculpture and reliefs.

1564, 1612, 1664, 1672
Two of Paris's oldest and most famous gardens are the Tuileries Garden, created in 1564 for the Tuileries Palace, and redone by André Le Nôtre between 1664 and 1672, and the Luxembourg Garden, for the Luxembourg Palace, built for Marie de' Medici in 1612, which today houses the French Senate.

Notre Dame dalla Senna

Reproduced from WIKI

Notre Dame dalla Senna

1594
The conflicts ended when pretender to the throne Henry IV, after converting to Catholicism to gain entry to the capital, entered the city in 1594 and claimed the crown of France.

1600, 1699
Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts.

1600, 1699
During the 17th century, Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of Louis XIII, was determined to make Paris the most beautiful city in Europe.

1600, 1699
Paris's urbanism laws have been under strict control since the early 17th century, particularly where street-front alignment, building height and building distribution is concerned.

1600, 1699
Sculptors such as Girardon, Coysevox and Coustou acquired reputations as the finest artists in the royal court in 17th-century France.

Louvre Museum Wikimedia Commons

Reproduced from WIKI

Louvre Museum Wikimedia Commons

1600, 1699
Paris did not become the acknowledged capital of French literature until the 17th century, with authors such as Boileau, Corneille, La Fontaine, Molière, Racine, several coming from the provinces, and the foundation of the Académie française.

1600, 1699, 1700, 1799
The café arrived in Paris in the 17th century, when the beverage was first brought from Turkey, and by the 18th century Parisian cafés were centres of the city's political and cultural life.

1610
The king would end his life in the capital, assassinated in a narrow street near Les Halles marketplace in 1610.

1626
The Jardin des Plantes was the first botanical garden in Paris, created in 1626 by Louis XIII's doctor Guy de La Brosse for the cultivation of medicinal plants.

1640, 1780
Paris grew in Population from about 400,000 in 1640 to 650,000 in 1780.

ParisiiCoins

Reproduced from WIKI

ParisiiCoins

1642
After Richelieu's death in 1642, it was the renamed the Palais-Royal.

1648
In 1648, the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture (Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture) was established to accommodate for the dramatic interest in art in the capital.

1680
The oldest and most famous Paris theatre is the Comédie-Française, founded in 1680.

1682
Due to the Parisian uprisings during the Fronde civil war, Louis XIV moved his court to a new palace, Versailles, in 1682.

1700, 1799, 1800, 1899
=== 18th and 19th centuries ===

Palais de la Cite

Reproduced from WIKI

Palais de la Cite

1700, 1799, 1898, 1909, 1925, 1928
The Hôtel Ritz on Place Vendôme opened in 1898, followed by the Hôtel Crillon in an 18th-century building on the Place de la Concorde in 1909; the Hotel Bristol on the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré in 1925; and the Hotel George V in 1928.

1700, 1799
In the 18th century, the literary life of Paris revolved around the cafés and salons, and was dominated by Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Pierre de Marivaux, and Beaumarchais.

1700, 1799
Since the late 18th century, Paris has been famous for its restaurants and haute cuisine, food meticulously prepared and artfully presented.

21 November 1783, 1751
Diderot and d'Alembert published their Encyclopédie in 1751, and the Montgolfier Brothers launched the first manned flight in a hot-air balloon on 21 November 1783, from the gardens of the Château de la Muette.

1786
A luxury restaurant, La Taverne Anglaise, opened in 1786 in the arcades of the Palais-Royal by Antoine Beauvilliers; it featured an elegant dining room, an extensive menu, linen tablecloths, a large wine list and well-trained waiters; it became a model for future Paris restaurants.

Lallemand - Arrestation du gouverneur de la Bastille - 1790

Reproduced from WIKI

Lallemand - Arrestation du gouverneur de la Bastille - 1790

1786
When inner-city burials were condemned from 1786, the contents of all Paris's parish cemeteries were transferred to a renovated section of Paris's stone mines outside the "Porte d'Enfer" city gate, today place Denfert-Rochereau in the 14th arrondissement.

1786, 1814
The process of moving bones from Cimetière des Innocents to the catacombs took place between 1786 and 1814; part of the network of tunnels and remains can be visited today on the official tour of the catacombs.

1789
In the summer of 1789, Paris became the centre stage of the French Revolution.

14 July 1789
Bastille Day, a celebration of the storming of the Bastille in 1789, the biggest festival in the city, is a military parade taking place every year on 14 July on the Champs-Élysées, from the Arc de Triomphe to Place de la Concorde.

14 July 1789
On 14 July, a mob seized the arsenal at the Invalides, acquiring thousands of guns, and stormed the Bastille, a symbol of royal authority.

Pantheon seen from Luxembourg Gardens %287144498077%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Pantheon seen from Luxembourg Gardens %287144498077%29

15 July 1789
The first independent Paris Commune, or city council, met in the Hôtel de Ville and, on 15 July, elected a Mayor, the astronomer Jean Sylvain Bailly.

1790
The Seine département had been governing Paris and its suburbs since its creation in 1790, but the rising suburban population had made it difficult to govern as a unique entity.

1793
In 1793, as the revolution turned more and more radical, the king, queen, and the mayor were guillotined, along with more than 16,000 others (throughout France), during the Reign of Terror.

25 March 1977, 1793, 1975
In 1975, the National Assembly changed the status of Paris to that of other French cities and, on 25 March 1977, Jacques Chirac became the first elected mayor of Paris since 1793.

1793
This served as France's top art school until 1793.

Biblioth%C3%A8que nationale de France%2C Paris %28site Richelieu%29 - Salle Ovale 2

Reproduced from WIKI

Biblioth%C3%A8que nationale de France%2C Paris %28site Richelieu%29 - Salle Ovale 2

20 March 1977, May 1793
The first modern elected mayor of Paris was Jacques Chirac, elected 20 March 1977, becoming the city's first mayor since 1793.

1795
The Conservatoire de Musique de Paris was founded in 1795.

1799, 1815
The population of Paris had dropped by 100,000 during the Revolution, but between 1799 and 1815, it surged with 160,000 new residents, reaching 660,000.

9 November 1799
A succession of revolutionary factions ruled Paris until 9 November 1799 (coup d'état du 18 brumaire), when Napoléon Bonaparte seized power as First Consul.

1800, 1899
Since the late 19th century, Paris has also been known as Panam(e) (pronounced [panam]) in French slang.

Charles Marville%2C Place de l%27Op%C3%A9ra%2C 1878

Reproduced from WIKI

Charles Marville%2C Place de l%27Op%C3%A9ra%2C 1878

1800, 1889, 1899, 1900
Late in the 19th century, Paris hosted two major international expositions: the 1889 Universal Exposition, was held to mark the centennial of the French Revolution and featured the new Eiffel Tower; and the 1900 Universal Exposition, which gave Paris the Pont Alexandre III, the Grand Palais, the Petit Palais and the first Paris Métro line.

1800, 1808, 1842, 1875, 1889, 1899, 1919
The 19th century produced the neoclassical church of La Madeleine (1808–1842); the Palais Garnier Opera House (1875); the neo-Byzantine Basilica of Sacré-Cœur (1875–1919), and the exuberant Belle Époque modernism of the Eiffel Tower (1889).

1800, 1899
The Paris agglomeration's urban sociology is basically that of 19th-century Paris: its fortuned classes are situated in its west and southwest, and its middle-to-lower classes are in its north and east.

1800, 1899, 1900, 1999
Paris was in its artistic prime in the 19th century and early 20th century, when it had a colony of artists established in the city and in art schools associated with some of the finest painters of the times: Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Berthe Morisot, Paul Gauguin, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and others.

1800, 1899
In the late 19th century, many artists in the French provinces and worldwide flocked to Paris to exhibit their works in the numerous salons and expositions and make a name for themselves.

Louis-Emile Durandelle%2C The Eiffel Tower - State of the Construction%2C 1888

Reproduced from WIKI

Louis-Emile Durandelle%2C The Eiffel Tower - State of the Construction%2C 1888

1800, 1899
The Orsay displays French art of the 19th century, including major collections of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists.

1800, 1899
The largest opera houses of Paris are the 19th-century Opéra Garnier (historical Paris Opéra) and modern Opéra Bastille; the former tends toward the more classic ballets and operas, and the latter provides a mixed repertoire of classic and modern.

1800, 1899
In middle of the 19th century, there were three other active and competing opera houses: the Opéra-Comique (which still exists), Théâtre-Italien, and Théâtre Lyrique (which in modern times changed its profile and name to Théâtre de la Ville).

1800, 1899
During the 19th century, Paris was the home and subject for some of France's greatest writers, including Charles Baudelaire, Stéphane Mallarmé, Mérimée, Alfred de Musset, Marcel Proust, Émile Zola, Alexandre Dumas, Gustave Flaubert, Guy de Maupassant and Honoré de Balzac.

1800, 1899
The famous Paris restaurants of the 19th century, including the Café de Paris, the Rocher de Cancale, the Café Anglais, Maison Dorée and the Café Riche, were mostly located near the theatres on the Boulevard des Italiens; they were immortalised in the novels of Balzac and Émile Zola.

The Liberation of Paris%2C 25 - 26 August 1944 HU66477

Reproduced from WIKI

The Liberation of Paris%2C 25 - 26 August 1944 HU66477

1800, 1899
Paris has been an international capital of high fashion since the 19th century, particularly in the domain of haute couture, clothing hand-made to order for private clients.

1800, 1899
The city is also the most important hub of France's motorway network, and is surrounded by three orbital freeways: the Périphérique, which follows the approximate path of 19th-century fortifications around Paris, the A86 motorway in the inner suburbs, and finally the Francilienne motorway in the outer suburbs.

1804, 1860
Open from 1804, these were the cemeteries of Père Lachaise, Montmartre, Montparnasse, and later Passy; these cemeteries became inner-city once again when Paris annexed all neighbouring communes to the inside of its much larger ring of suburban fortifications in 1860.

1809
From 1809, the Canal de l'Ourcq provided Paris with water from less-polluted rivers to the north-east of the capital.

1814
Its name is said to have come in 1814 from the Russian soldiers who occupied the city; "bistro" means "quickly" in Russian, and they wanted their meals served rapidly so they could get back their encampment.

Place de la R%C3%A9publique%2C 18h50%2C une foule silencieuse

Reproduced from WIKI

Place de la R%C3%A9publique%2C 18h50%2C une foule silencieuse

1817
The Hotel Meurice, opened for British travellers in 1817, was one of the first luxury hotels in Paris.

1825
The inventor Nicéphore Niépce produced the first permanent photograph on a polished pewter plate in Paris in 1825.

1827
A third one is the 1827 artificially created île aux Cygnes.

1829
Gas lights were installed on the Place du Carousel, Rue de Rivoli and Place Vendome in 1829.

1830, 1839
Another of Victor Hugo's works, Les Misérables, written while he was in exile outside France during the Second Empire, described the social change and political turmoil in Paris in the early 1830s.

Paris raining autumn cityscape %288252181936%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Paris raining autumn cityscape %288252181936%29

July 1830
During the Restoration, the bridges and squares of Paris were returned to their pre-Revolution names, but the July Revolution of 1830 in Paris, (commemorated by the July Column on Place de la Bastille), brought a constitutional monarch, Louis Philippe I, to power.

1835
AFP, as it is colloquially abbreviated, maintains its headquarters in Paris, as it has since 1835.

1837
The first railway line to Paris opened in 1837, beginning a new period of massive migration from the provinces to the city.

1839, 1860, 1869, 1880, 1889
In 1839, after the death of Niépce, Louis Daguerre patented the Daguerrotype, which became the most common form of photography until the 1860s. The work of Étienne-Jules Marey in the 1880s contributed considerably to the development of modern photography.

1848
Louis-Philippe was overthrown by a popular uprising in the streets of Paris in 1848.

Facade of H%C3%B4tel de Ville de Paris - 2012

Reproduced from WIKI

Facade of H%C3%B4tel de Ville de Paris - 2012

1853
Between 1853 and 1870 they rebuilt the city centre, created the wide downtown boulevards and squares where the boulevards intersected, imposed standard facades along the boulevards, and required that the facades be built of the distinctive cream-grey "Paris stone".

1853, 1870
Between 1853 and 1870, the Emperor Napoleon III and the city's first director of parks and gardens, Jean-Charles Alphand, created the Bois de Boulogne, the Bois de Vincennes, Parc Montsouris and the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont, located at the four points of the compass around the city, as well as many smaller parks, squares and gardens in the Paris's quarters.

1855, 1862, 1878
The arrival of the railways and the Paris Exposition of 1855 brought the first flood of tourists and the first modern grand hotels; the Hôtel du Louvre (now an antiques marketplace) in 1855; the Grand Hotel (now the InterContinental Paris Le Grand Hotel) in 1862; and the Hôtel Continental in 1878.

1857, 1860, 1869
By 1857, the Grand boulevards were lit. By the 1860s, the boulevards and streets of Paris were illuminated by 56,000 gas lamps.

1857
From 1857, the civil engineer Eugène Belgrand, under Napoleon III, oversaw the construction of a series of new aqueducts that brought water from locations all around the city to several reservoirs built atop the Capital's highest points of elevation.

Elys%C3%A9e Palace%2C Paris 2005

Reproduced from WIKI

Elys%C3%A9e Palace%2C Paris 2005

1860
In 1860, Napoleon III also annexed the surrounding towns and created eight new arrondissements, expanding Paris to its current limits.

1860
The city's last major annexation of outlying territories in 1860 not only gave it its modern form but also created the 20 clockwise-spiralling arrondissements (municipal boroughs).

1860, 1920, 1929
From the 1860 area of 78 km2 (30 sq mi), the city limits were expanded marginally to 86.9 km2 (33.6 sq mi) in the 1920s.

1860, 1900, 1999
Aside from the 20th-century addition of the Bois de Boulogne, Bois de Vincennes and Paris heliport, Paris's administrative limits have remained unchanged since 1860.

1867
Beginning with the Paris Exposition of 1867; it became a popular kind of restaurant which featured beer and other beverages served by young women in the national costume associated with the beverage, particular German costumes for beer.

Conseil d%27Etat Paris WA

Reproduced from WIKI

Conseil d%27Etat Paris WA

1870, 1871
During the Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871), Paris was besieged by the Prussian army.

1870
By 1870, Paris had become an important centre for symphony, ballet and operatic music.

28 January 1871
After months of blockade, hunger, and then bombardment by the Prussians, the city was forced to surrender on 28 January 1871.

28 March 1871
On 28 March, a revolutionary government called the Paris Commune seized power in Paris.

May 1871
The Commune held power for two months, until it was harshly suppressed by the French army during the "Bloody Week" at the end of May 1871.

Gendarmerie BMW R1100RT

Reproduced from WIKI

Gendarmerie BMW R1100RT

3 March 1875
Georges Bizet's Carmen premiered 3 March 1875.

1889, 1900
Popular landmarks in the centre of the city include the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris and the Gothic royal chapel of Sainte-Chapelle, both on the Île de la Cité; the Eiffel Tower, constructed for the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889; the Grand Palais and Petit Palais, built for the Paris Universal Exposition of 1900; the Arc de Triomphe on the Champs-Élysées, and the Basilica of Sacré-Coeur on the hill of Montmartre.

1889
The Moulin Rouge was opened in 1889.

28 December 1895
The movie industry was born in Paris when Auguste and Louis Lumière projected the first motion picture for a paying audience at the Grand Café on 28 December 1895.

1900
Opened in 1900, the city's subway system, the Paris Métro, serves 5.23 million passengers daily, and is the second busiest metro system in Europe after Moscow Metro.

Tour Eiffel 360 Panorama

Reproduced from WIKI

Tour Eiffel 360 Panorama

1900, 2024
Paris hosted the Olympic Games in 1900, 1924 and will host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

1900, 1999
=== 20th and 21st centuries ===

1900, 1977, 1999
Striking examples of 20th-century architecture include the Centre Georges Pompidou by Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano (1977), and the Louvre Pyramid by I. M.

1900, 2017
The third most visited Paris museum, in a building constructed for the Universal Exhibition of 1900 as the Orsay railway station, was the Musée d'Orsay, which had 3.2 million visitors in 2017.

1900, 1999
In the 20th century, the Paris literary community was dominated by figures such as Colette, André Gide, François Mauriac, André Malraux, Albert Camus, and, after World War II, by Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Camille Pissarro - Boulevard Montmartre - Eremitage

Reproduced from WIKI

Camille Pissarro - Boulevard Montmartre - Eremitage

1900, 1999
Paris is the spiritual home of gypsy jazz in particular, and many of the Parisian jazzmen who developed in the first half of the 20th century began by playing Bal-musette in the city.

1900
The Michelin Guide has been a standard guide to French restaurants since 1900, awarding its highest award, three stars, to the best restaurants in France.

1900, 1999
In the 20th century, the cafés of the Left Bank, especially Café de la Rotonde and Le Dôme Café in Montparnasse and Café de Flore and Les Deux Magots on Boulevard Saint Germain, all still in business, were important meeting places for painters, writers and philosophers.

1900, 1924, 2024
Paris hosted the 1900 and 1924 Summer Olympics and will host the 2024 Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games.

1900
Since the inauguration of its first line in 1900, Paris's Métro (subway) network has grown to become the city's most widely used local transport system; today it carries about 5.23 million passengers daily through 16 lines, 303 stations (385 stops) and 220 km (136.7 mi) of rails.

Rue de Rivoli at night%2C Paris August 2013

Reproduced from WIKI

Rue de Rivoli at night%2C Paris August 2013

1900, 1999
New suburban cemeteries were created in the early 20th century: The largest of these are the Cimetière parisien de Saint-Ouen, the Cimetière parisien de Pantin (also known as Cimetière parisien de Pantin-Bobigny), the Cimetière parisien d'Ivry, and the Cimetière parisien de Bagneux.

1901
By 1901, the population of Paris had grown to 2,715,000.

1905, 1907
Picasso, living in Le Bateau-Lavoir in Montmartre, painted his famous La Famille de Saltimbanques and Les Demoiselles d'Avignon between 1905 and 1907.

1911
In 1911, the dance hall Olympia Paris invented the grand staircase as a settling for its shows, competing with its great rival, the Folies Bergère.

1913
Another musical landmark is the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, where the first performances of Diaghilev's Ballets Russes took place in 1913.

Piazza dei Vosgi - panoramio

Reproduced from WIKI

Piazza dei Vosgi - panoramio

1920, 1929
Its stars in the 1920s included the American singer and dancer Josephine Baker.

1921
The population of Paris today is lower than its historical peak of 2.9 million in 1921.

1929
In 1929, the Bois de Boulogne and Bois de Vincennes forest parks were officially annexed to the city, bringing its area to about 105 km2 (41 sq mi).

1930, 1939, 1940, 1949
Django Reinhardt rose to fame in Paris, having moved to the 18th arrondissement in a caravan as a young boy, and performed with violinist Stéphane Grappelli and their Quintette du Hot Club de France in the 1930s and 1940s.

1930, 1939
Many of Paris's concert/dance halls were transformed into cinemas when the media became popular beginning in the 1930s.

Paris SPOT 1017

Reproduced from WIKI

Paris SPOT 1017

1938, 1960, 1998, 2007, 2016
The 1938 and 1998 FIFA World Cups, the 2007 Rugby World Cup, and the 1960, 1984, and 2016 UEFA European Championships were also held in the city and, every July, the Tour de France bicycle race finishes there.

1938, 1998, 2007
The city also hosted the finals of the 1938 FIFA World Cup (at the Stade Olympique de Colombes), as well as the 1998 FIFA World Cup and the 2007 Rugby World Cup Final (both at the Stade de France).

14 June 1940
On 14 June 1940, the German army marched into Paris, which had been declared an "open city".

July 1942
On 16–17 July 1942, following German orders, the French police and gendarmes arrested 12,884 Jews, including 4,115 children, and confined them during five days at the Vel d'Hiv (Vélodrome d'Hiver), from which they were transported by train to the extermination camp at Auschwitz.

1944
The national police has its own special unit for riot control and crowd control and security of public buildings, called the Compagnies Républicaines de Sécurité (CRS), a unit formed in 1944 right after the liberation of France.

BNF et l%27UPMC vues de la Tour Saint-Jacques%2C Paris ao%C3%BBt 2014

Reproduced from WIKI

BNF et l%27UPMC vues de la Tour Saint-Jacques%2C Paris ao%C3%BBt 2014

25 August 1944
On 25 August 1944, the city was liberated by the French 2nd Armoured Division and the 4th Infantry Division of the United States Army.

1946, 1951
Other famous Paris music halls include Le Lido, on the Champs-Élysées, opened in 1946; and the Crazy Horse Saloon, featuring strip-tease, dance and magic, opened in 1951.

1949, 1974
Sixty-two percent of its buildings date from 1949 and before, 20 percent were built between 1949 and 1974, and only 18 percent of the buildings remaining were built after that date.

August 1961, 1950, 1959, 1960, 1969
In the 1950s and the 1960s, Paris became one front of the Algerian War for independence; in August 1961, the pro-independence FLN targeted and killed 11 Paris policemen, leading to the imposition of a curfew on Muslims of Algeria (who, at that time, were French citizens).

1950, 1959, 1980, 1989
Orly Airport, located in the southern suburbs of Paris, replaced Le Bourget as the principal airport of Paris from the 1950s to the 1980s.

Paris 75018 Basilique du Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur 20160223 exterior %2801%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Paris 75018 Basilique du Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur 20160223 exterior %2801%29

1954, 1990
The population of Paris dropped from 2,850,000 in 1954 to 2,152,000 in 1990, as middle-class families moved to the suburbs.

July 2004, 1954, 2009, 2017
The city's population loss came to an end in the 21st century; the population estimate of July 2004 showed a population increase for the first time since 1954, and the population reached 2,234,000 by 2009, before declining again slightly in 2017.

1956, 1965
Rome, Italy, 1956Seule Paris est digne de Rome; seule Rome est digne de Paris. (in French)

9 April 1956
Since 9 April 1956, Paris is exclusively and reciprocally twinned only with:

1960, 1969, 1970, 1979
Many other suburban residential districts (grands ensembles) were built between the 1960s and 1970s to provide a low-cost solution for a rapidly expanding population: these districts were socially mixed at first, but few residents actually owned their homes (the growing economy made these accessible to the middle classes only from the 1970s).

Panorama La D%C3%A9fense

Reproduced from WIKI

Panorama La D%C3%A9fense

1960, 1969, 2014
The winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature, Patrick Modiano (who lives in Paris), based most of his literary work on the depiction of the city during World War II and the 1960s–1970s.

1960, 1969
Most of the clubs closed by the early 1960s, as musical tastes shifted toward rock and roll.

1960, 1969, 1970, 1979
Most of the grandes écoles were relocated to the suburbs of Paris in the 1960s and 1970s, in new campuses much larger than the old campuses within the crowded city of Paris, though the École Normale Supérieure has remained on rue d'Ulm in the 5th arrondissement.

1961
Paul Delouvrier promised to resolve the Paris-suburbs mésentente when he became head of the Paris region in 1961: two of his most ambitious projects for the Region were the construction of five suburban "villes nouvelles" ("new cities") and the RER commuter train network.

17 October 1961
On 17 October 1961, an unauthorised but peaceful protest demonstration of Algerians against the curfew led to violent confrontations between the police and demonstrators, in which at least 40 people were killed, including some thrown into the Seine.

Paris - Eiffelturm und Marsfeld2

Reproduced from WIKI

Paris - Eiffelturm und Marsfeld2

1962
The anti-independence Organisation armée secrète (OAS), for their part, carried out a series of bombings in Paris throughout 1961 and 1962.

1962, 1975
The principal reasons were a significant decline in household size, and a dramatic migration of residents to the suburbs between 1962 and 1975.

1967
The Orchestre de Paris was established in 1967.

1968
This problem was 'resolved' when its parent "District de la région parisienne" ('district of the Paris region') was reorganised into several new departments from 1968: Paris became a department in itself, and the administration of its suburbs was divided between the three new departments surrounding it.

1968, 1970
It was broken up into thirteen autonomous universities in 1970, following the student demonstrations in 1968.

Visiter le Louvre en %C3%A9t%C3%A9 %21 %284787187477%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Visiter le Louvre en %C3%A9t%C3%A9 %21 %284787187477%29

May 1968
In May 1968, protesting students occupied the Sorbonne and put up barricades in the Latin Quarter.

May 1968
The May 1968 events in France resulted in the break-up of the University of Paris into 13 independent campuses.

1969, 1973
The Tour Maine-Montparnasse, the tallest building in the city at 57 storeys and 210 metres (689 feet) high, was built between 1969 and 1973.

1970, 1979
Between the wars it was the home of many important expatriate writers, including Ernest Hemingway, Samuel Beckett, and, in the 1970s, Milan Kundera.

1970, 1979
In the 1970s, 80 percent of French-language publishing houses were found in Paris, almost all on the Left Bank in the 5th, 6th and 7th arrondissements.

Paris - Passage Jouffroy - PA00088996 - 2015 - 003

Reproduced from WIKI

Paris - Passage Jouffroy - PA00088996 - 2015 - 003

1973
A suburban railway network, the RER (Réseau Express Régional), was built to complement the Métro, and the Périphérique expressway encircling the city, was completed in 1973.

1973
The 210 metres (690 ft) Montparnasse tower was both Paris and France's tallest building until 1973, but this record has been held by the La Défense quarter Tour First tower in Courbevoie since its 2011 construction.

1974
The city was not granted municipal autonomy by the National Assembly until 1974.

1974, 1993
Charles de Gaulle Airport, located on the edge of the northern suburbs of Paris, opened to commercial traffic in 1974 and became the busiest Parisian airport in 1993.

1975
Since 1975, the race has finished on the Champs-Elysées.

Champs-Elys%C3%A9es%2C vue de la Concorde %C3%A0 l%27Etoile

Reproduced from WIKI

Champs-Elys%C3%A9es%2C vue de la Concorde %C3%A0 l%27Etoile

1977, 1983, 1985, 1986, 1989, 1996, 2006
Most of the postwar's Presidents of the Fifth Republic wanted to leave their own monuments in Paris; President Georges Pompidou started the Centre Georges Pompidou (1977), Valéry Giscard d'Estaing began the Musée d'Orsay (1986); President François Mitterrand, in power for 14 years, built the Opéra Bastille (1985–1989), the new site of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (1996), the Arche de la Défense (1985–1989), and the Louvre Pyramid with its underground courtyard (1983–1989); Jacques Chirac (2006), the Musée du quai Branly.

1977
The district of the Paris region was renamed "Île-de-France" in 1977, but this abbreviated "Paris region" name is still commonly used today to describe the Île-de-France, and as a vague reference to the entire Paris agglomeration.

1977, 1987, 1992, 1997
Since 1977, the city has created 166 new parks, most notably the Parc de la Villette (1987), Parc André Citroën (1992), and Parc de Bercy (1997).

1980, 1989
Paris averages 1.9 people per residence, a number that has remained constant since the 1980s, but it is much less than Île-de-France's 2.33 person-per-residence average.

1980, 1989
This music became popular during the 1980s.

Mignard-autoportrait

Reproduced from WIKI

Mignard-autoportrait

1980, 1989
Domestically, air travel between Paris and some of France's largest cities such as Lyon, Marseille, or Strasbourg has been in a large measure replaced by high-speed rail due to the opening of several high-speed TGV rail lines from the 1980s.

May 1982
In 1982, Mayor Chirac introduced the motorcycle-mounted Motocrotte to remove dog faeces from Paris streets.

1986
The Médiathèque Musicale Mahler in the 8th arrondissement opened in 1986 and contains collections related to music.

1989
Pei (1989).

1990, 1999
The second-largest business district in terms of employment is La Défense, just west of the city, where many companies installed their offices in the 1990s.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir%2C Le Moulin de la Galette

Reproduced from WIKI

Pierre-Auguste Renoir%2C Le Moulin de la Galette

1990, 2010
Paris region manufacturing specialises in transportation, mainly automobiles, aircraft and trains, but this is in a sharp decline: Paris proper manufacturing jobs dropped by 64 percent between 1990 and 2010, and the Paris region lost 48 percent during the same period.

1990, 1999
Big multiplex cinemas have been built since the 1990s.

1991
The banks of the Seine from the Pont de Sully to the Pont d'Iéna have been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1991.

1994
The François Mitterrand Library (nicknamed Très Grande Bibliothèque) in the 13th arrondissement was completed in 1994 to a design of Dominique Perrault and contains four glass towers.

July 1995
Between July and October 1995, a series of bombings carried out by the Armed Islamic Group of Algeria caused 8 deaths and more than 200 injuries.

Paris July 2011-27a

Reproduced from WIKI

Paris July 2011-27a

1998
The 80,000-seat Stade de France, built for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, is located just north of Paris in the neighbouring commune of Saint-Denis.

1998
The 80,000-seat Stade de France, built for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, is located just north of Paris in the commune of Saint-Denis.

2000, 2006
Two UEFA Champions League Finals in the current century have also been played in the Stade de France: the 2000 and 2006 editions.

2000, 2001, 2014
For example, after the LGV Méditerranée opened in 2001, air traffic between Paris and Marseille declined from 2,976,793 passengers in 2000 to 1,502,196 passengers in 2014.

2 February 2000
On 2 February 2000, Philippe Binant realised the first digital cinema projection in Europe, with the DLP CINEMA technology developed by Texas Instruments, in Paris.

The Mus%C3%A9e dOrsay at sunset%2C Paris July 2013

Reproduced from WIKI

The Mus%C3%A9e dOrsay at sunset%2C Paris July 2013

2001, 2014
Mayor Bertrand Delanoë (2001–2014) was elected by only a minority of city voters, but a majority of council members.

2001, 2018
The number of city employees increased from 40,000 in 2001 to 55,000 in 2018.

March 2001
In March 2001, Bertrand Delanoë became the first Socialist Mayor of Paris.

2002
The traditional kepis of the gendarmes were replaced in 2002 with caps, and the force modernised, though they still wear kepis for ceremonial occasions.

2002
The project was abandoned in 2002 for a new and better enforced local law, under the terms of which dog owners can be fined up to €500 for not removing their dog faeces.

Mus%C3%A9e du quai Branly

Reproduced from WIKI

Mus%C3%A9e du quai Branly

2003
Longer periods of more intense heat sometimes occur, such as the heat wave of 2003 when temperatures exceeded 30 °C (86 °F) for weeks, reached 40 °C (104 °F) on some days and seldom cooled down at night.

2006, 2014, 2018
Contemporary architecture includes the Musée du quad Branly by Jean Nouvel (2006), the contemporary art museum of the Louis Vuitton Foundation by Frank Gehry (2014). and the new Tribunal de Justice by Renzo Piano (2018).

2006, 2011
The total number of residences in the city of Paris in 2011 was 1,356,074, up from a former high of 1,334,815 in 2006.

2006
Among these, 1,165,541 (85.9 percent) were main residences, 91,835 (6.8 percent) were secondary residences, and the remaining 7.3 percent were empty (down from 9.2 percent in 2006).

2006, 2007, 2014
After the LGV Est opened in 2007, air traffic between Paris and Strasbourg declined from 1,006,327 passengers in 2006 to 157,207 passengers in 2014.

Com%C3%A9die Fran%C3%A7aise colonnes

Reproduced from WIKI

Com%C3%A9die Fran%C3%A7aise colonnes

2007
In 2007, in an effort to reduce car traffic in the city, he introduced the Vélib', a system which rents bicycles for the use of local residents and visitors.

2007
In 2007, President Nicolas Sarkozy launched the Grand Paris project, to integrate Paris more closely with the towns in the region around it.

2007, 2012
According to the 2012 French census, 586,163 residents of the City of Paris, or 26.2 percent, and 2,782,834 residents of the Paris Region (Île-de-France), or 23.4 percent, were born outside of Metropolitan France (the last figure up from 22.4% at the 2007 census).26,700 of these in the City of Paris and 210,159 in the Paris Region were people born in Overseas France (more than two-thirds of whom in the French West Indies) and are therefore not counted as immigrants since they were legally French citizens at birth.

2008
An IFOP survey in 2008 reported that, of immigrants from these predominantly Muslim countries, 25 percent went to the mosque regularly; 41 percent practised the religion, and 34 percent were believers but did not practice the religion.

2009
In 2009, around 40 percent of Parisians held a licence-level diploma or higher, the highest proportion in France, while 13 percent have no diploma, the third-lowest percentage in France.

Victor Hugo by %C3%89tienne Carjat 1876

Reproduced from WIKI

Victor Hugo by %C3%89tienne Carjat 1876

2010
The Paris Region had 5.4 million salaried employees in 2010, of whom 2.2 million were concentrated in 39 pôles d'emplois or business districts.

2010
In 2010, it was the workplace of 500,000 salaried employees, about 30 percent of the salaried employees in Paris and 10 percent of those in the Île-de-France.

2010
In 2010, it was the workplace of 144,600 employees, of whom 38 percent worked in finance and insurance, 16 percent in business support services.

2011
It reached 2.25 million in 2011.

2011
In 2011, the City of Paris and the national government approved the plans for the Grand Paris Express, totalling 205 kilometres (127 miles) of automated metro lines to connect Paris, the innermost three departments around Paris, airports and high-speed rail (TGV) stations, at an estimated cost of €35 billion.

Olympia facade

Reproduced from WIKI

Olympia facade

2011
According to a 2011 survey by IFOP, a French public opinion research organisation, 61 percent of residents of the Paris Region (Île-de-France) identified themselves as Roman Catholic, though just 15 percent said they were practising Catholics, while 46 percent were non-practicing.

2011
In 2011, its GDP ranked second among the regions of Europe and its per-capita GDP was the 4th highest in Europe.

2011
While the Paris region's population accounted for 18.8 percent of metropolitan France in 2011, the Paris region's GDP accounted for 30 percent of metropolitan France's GDP.

2011
In 2011, while only 56,927 construction workers worked in Paris itself, its metropolitan area employed 246,639, in an activity centred largely around the Seine-Saint-Denis (41,378) and Hauts-de-Seine (37,303) departments and the new business-park centres appearing there.

2011
The average net household income (after social, pension and health insurance contributions) in Paris was €36,085 for 2011.

Charles Aznavour Cannes

Reproduced from WIKI

Charles Aznavour Cannes

2011
The median taxable income for 2011 was around €25,000 in Paris and €22,200 for Île-de-France.

2012
Eurostat, the statistical agency of the EU, places Paris (6.5 million people) second behind London (8 million) and ahead of Berlin (3.5 million), based on the 2012 populations of what Eurostat calls "urban audit core cities".

2012
The Paris Metropolitan Area is the second most populous in the European Union after London with a population of 12,341,418 at the Jan. 2012 census.

2012
According to the 2012 census, 135,853 residents of the city of Paris were immigrants from Europe, 112,369 were immigrants from the Maghreb, 70,852 from sub-Saharan Africa and Egypt, 5,059 from Turkey, 91,297 from Asia (outside Turkey), 38,858 from the Americas, and 1,365 from the South Pacific.

2012
In 2012, there were 8,810 British citizens and 10,019 US citizens living in the City of Paris (Ville de Paris), and 20,466 British citizens and 16,408 US citizens living in the entire Paris Region (Île-de-France).

Le Grand Rex Paris

Reproduced from WIKI

Le Grand Rex Paris

2012, 2013
In 2012 and 2013, it was estimated that there were almost 500,000 Muslims in the City of Paris, 1.5 million Muslims in the Île-de-France region, and 4 to 5 million Muslims in France.

2012
At the 2012 census, 59.5% of jobs in the Paris Region were in market services (12.0% in wholesale and retail trade, 9.7% in professional, scientific, and technical services, 6.5% in information and communication, 6.5% in transportation and warehousing, 5.9% in finance and insurance, 5.8% in administrative and support services, 4.6% in accommodation and food services, and 8.5% in various other market services), 26.9% in non-market services (10.4% in human health and social work activities, 9.6% in public administration and defence, and 6.9% in education), 8.2% in manufacturing and utilities (6.6% in manufacturing and 1.5% in utilities), 5.2% in construction, and 0.2% in agriculture.

2012
According to 2012 INSEE figures, 68 percent of employees in the City of Paris work in commerce, transportation, and services; 24.4 percent in public administration, health and social services; 4.4 percent in industry, and 0.1 percent in agriculture.

2012
In 2012, 14 percent of households in the city earned less than €977 per month, the official poverty line.

2012
As of 2012, around 50% of electricity generated in the Île-de-France comes from cogeneration energy plants located near the outer limits of the region; other energy sources include the Nogent nuclear power plant (35%), trash incineration (9% – with cogeneration plants, these provide the city in heat as well), methane gas (5%), hydraulics (1%), solar power (0.1%) and a negligible amount of wind power (0.034 GWh).

Brasserie Vagenende 1

Reproduced from WIKI

Brasserie Vagenende 1

January 2012
According to INSEE, the Paris Urban Area had a population of 10,550,350 at the January 2012 census, the most populous in the European Union, and third most populous in Europe, behind Istanbul and Moscow.

2013
City-influenced commuter activity reaches well beyond even this in a statistical aire urbaine de Paris (a measure of metropolitan area), that had a 2013 population of 12,405,426, a number one-fifth the population of France, the largest metropolitan area in the Eurozone.

2013
One of the newest parks, the Promenade des Berges de la Seine (2013), built on a former highway on the Left Bank of the Seine between the Pont de l'Alma and the Musée d'Orsay, has floating gardens and gives a view of the city's landmarks.

June 2013
Bertrand Delanoë also transformed a section of the highway along the Left Bank of the Seine into an urban promenade and park, the Promenade des Berges de la Seine, which he inaugurated in June 2013.

2014
This is a decline of 37,345 (-1.66%), from 2014.

Lesdeuxmagots

Reproduced from WIKI

Lesdeuxmagots

2014
The Jewish population of the Paris Region was estimated in 2014 to be 282,000, the largest concentration of Jews in the world outside of Israel and the United States.

2014
Four hundred automobile industry companies employ another 100,000 workers: many of these are centred in the Yvelines department around the Renault and PSA-Citroen plants (this department alone employs 33,000), but the industry as a whole suffered a major loss with the 2014 closing of a major Aulnay-sous-Bois Citroen assembly plant.

2014
Together these three airports recorded traffic of 96.5 million passengers in 2014.

5 April 2014
On 5 April 2014, Anne Hidalgo, a Socialist, was elected the first female Mayor of Paris.

5 April 2014
The current mayor is Anne Hidalgo, a socialist, elected 5 April 2014.

Magdalena Frackowiak

Reproduced from WIKI

Magdalena Frackowiak

October 2014
There are also notable private museums; The Contemporary Art museum of the Louis Vuitton Foundation, designed by architect Frank Gehry, opened in October 2014 in the Bois de Boulogne.

2015
Besides this, the Paris metropolitan area had a population of 12,532,901 in 2015.

2015
Gare du Nord is the 24th busiest railway station in the world, with 262 million passengers in 2015.

2015
Unemployment was estimated at 8.2 percent in the city of Paris and 8.8 percent in the Île-de-France region in the first trimester of 2015.

7 January 2015, 9 January 2015
On 7 January 2015, two French Muslim extremists attacked the Paris headquarters of Charlie Hebdo and killed thirteen people, in an attack claimed by Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, and on 9 January, a third terrorist, who claimed he was part of ISIL, killed four hostages during an attack at a Jewish grocery store at Porte de Vincennes.

French Republican Guard Bastille Day 2007 n1

Reproduced from WIKI

French Republican Guard Bastille Day 2007 n1

January 2015
Philharmonie de Paris, the modern symphonic concert hall of Paris, opened in January 2015.

11 January 2015
On 11 January an estimated 1.5 million people marched in Paris in a show of solidarity against terrorism and in support of freedom of speech.

13 November 2015
On 13 November of the same year, a series of coordinated bomb and gunfire terrorist attacks in Paris and Saint-Denis, claimed by ISIL, killed 130 people and injured more than 350.

15 December 2015
On 15 December 2015, a list of candidates of the Union of the Right, a coalition of centrist and right-wing parties, led by Valérie Pécresse, narrowly won the regional election, defeating a coalition of Socialists and ecologists.

19 December 2015
On 19 December 2015, Paris and other worldwide fans commemorated the 100th anniversary of the birth of Edith Piaf—a French cabaret singer, songwriter and actress who became widely regarded as France's national chanteuse, as well as being one of France's greatest international stars.

Paris 75005 Rue Saint-Jacques La Sorbonne facade 01c

Reproduced from WIKI

Paris 75005 Rue Saint-Jacques La Sorbonne facade 01c

2016
In 2016, measured by the MasterCard Global Cities Destination Index, Paris was the third-busiest airline destination in the world, with 18.03 million visitors, behind Bangkok (21.47 million) and London (19.88 million).

2016
The company paid the city government 7.3 million Euros in 2016.

2016
The National Museum of Natural History, on the Left Bank, attracted 1.76 million visitors in 2016.

2016
Paris has most recently been the host for UEFA Euro 2016, both at the Parc des Princes in the city proper and also at Stade de France, with the latter hosting the opening match and final.

1 January 2016
After many modifications, the new area, named the Metropolis of Grand Paris, with a population of 6.7 million, was created on 1 January 2016.

DSC 7111-lycee-louis-le-gra

Reproduced from WIKI

DSC 7111-lycee-louis-le-gra

1 January 2016
The Métropole du Grand Paris, or simply Grand Paris, formally came into existence on 1 January 2016.

22 January 2016
The first president of the metropolitan council, Patrick Ollier, a Republican and the mayor of the town of Rueil-Malmaison, was elected on 22 January 2016.

1 January 2016
Long-intended measures to unite Paris with its suburbs began on 1 January 2016, when the Métropole du Grand Paris came into existence.

September 2016, 2017
In the 2017 worldwide cost of living survey by the Economist Intelligence Unit, based on a survey made in September 2016, Paris ranked as the seventh most expensive city in the world, and the second most expensive in Europe, after Zurich.

2017
The city is a major rail, highway, and air-transport hub served by two international airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle (the second busiest airport in Europe after London Heathrow Airport with 69.5 million passengers in 2017) and Paris-Orly.

Salle de lecture Bibliotheque Sainte-Genevieve n01

Reproduced from WIKI

Salle de lecture Bibliotheque Sainte-Genevieve n01

2017
Paris is especially known for its museums and architectural landmarks: the Louvre was the most visited art museum in the world in 2017, with 8.1 million visitors.

2017
Paris received 23 million visitors in 2017, measured by hotel stays, with the largest numbers of foreign visitors coming from the United States, the UK, Germany and China.

2017
It was ranked as the third most visited travel destination in the world in 2017, after Bangkok and London.

2017
Social or public housing represented 19.9 percent of the city's total residences in 2017.

2017
Greater Paris, comprising Paris and its three surrounding departments, received 23.6 million visitors in 2017, measured by hotel arrivals.

Finale Coupe de France 2010-2011 %28Lille LOSC vs Paris SG PSG%29

Reproduced from WIKI

Finale Coupe de France 2010-2011 %28Lille LOSC vs Paris SG PSG%29

2017
The city's top tourist attraction was the Notre Dame Cathedral, which welcomed an estimated 12,000,000 visitors in 2017.

2017
In the Paris region, Disneyland Paris, in Marne-la-Vallée, 32 kilometres (20 miles) east of the centre of Paris, received 9.66 million visitors in 2017.

2017
In 2017 Greater Paris had 2,020 hotels, including 85 five-star hotels, with a total of 119,000 rooms.

2017
In addition to hotels, in 2017 Greater Paris had 84,000 homes registered with Airbnb, which received 2.3 million visitors.

2017
The Louvre was the most visited art museum in the world in 2017, with 8.1 million visitors.

Tour de france 2010 - Champs Elys%C3%A9es n10

Reproduced from WIKI

Tour de france 2010 - Champs Elys%C3%A9es n10

2017
It attracted 2.4 million visitors in 2017.

2017
It received 1.4 million visitors in 2017.

2017
The Bercy Arena also hosted the 2017 IIHF World Ice Hockey Championship, together with Cologne, Germany.

2017
For the year 2017 it was the 5th busiest airport in the world by international traffic and it is the hub for the nation's flag carrier Air France.

3 February 2017
On 3 February 2017, a two-backpack-carrying, machete-wielding attacker shouting "Allahu Akbar" attacked soldiers guarding the Louvre museum after they stopped him because of his bags; the assailant was shot, and no explosives were found.

Metro Paris 2008 08

Reproduced from WIKI

Metro Paris 2008 08

18 March 2017
On 18 March of the same year, in a Vitry-sur-Seine bar, a man held patrons hostage, then fled to later hold a gun to the head of an Orly Airport French soldier, shouting "I am here to die in the name of Allah", and was shot dead by the soldier's comrades.

20 April 2017
On 20 April, a man shot dead French police officer on the Champs-Élysées, and was later shot dead himself.

19 June 2017
On 19 June, a man rammed his weapons-and-explosives-laden vehicle into a police van on the Champs-Élysées, but the car only burst into flames.

2018
According to the Economist Intelligence Unit Worldwide Cost of Living Survey in 2018, Paris was the second-most expensive city in the world, behind Singapore and ahead of Zurich, Hong Kong, Oslo and Geneva.

2018
The budget of the city for 2018 is 9.5 billion Euros, with an expected deficit of 5.5 billion Euros. 7.9 billion Euros are designated for city administration, and 1.7 billion Euros for investment.

Ile de la Cite from Pont de la Tournelle

Reproduced from WIKI

Ile de la Cite from Pont de la Tournelle

2018
The most expensive residential streets in Paris in 2018 by average price per square meter were Avenue Montaigne (8th arrondissement), at 22,372 Euros per square meter; Place Dauphine (1st arrondissement) (20,373 Euros); and Rue de Furstemberg (6th arrondissement) at 18,839 Euros per square meter.

2018
However, declined once again in 2018.

2018
The top ten French companies listed in the Fortune Global 500 for 2018 all have their headquarters in the Paris Region; six in the central business district of the City of Paris; and four close to the city in the Hauts-de-Seine Department, three in La Défense and one in Boulogne-Billancourt.

2018
In the first trimester of 2018, the unemployment rate in the city of Paris was 7.1 percent.

2018
In 2018, of the 27 Michelin three-star restaurants in France, ten are located in Paris.

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont%2C 22 April 2007

Reproduced from WIKI

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont%2C 22 April 2007

1 January 2018
The official population of the city of Paris was 2,206,488 as of January 1, 2018, according to INSEE, the official French statistical agency.

February 2018
On the night of February 15–16, 2018, during a spell of cold weather, the City of Paris conducted a citywide count of homeless persons, carried out by two thousand volunteers.

2020
By 2020 its basic competencies will include urban planning, housing and protection of the environment.

2030
The system is scheduled to be completed by 2030.